Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris

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Enter Lara Croft and the throwaway characters!

I know what some of my fellow non-Xbox One owners are thinking: This game is a cheap throwaway to try and satiate us until the very delayed release of Rise of the Tomb Raider on the PS4. How insulting and demeaning!

Well, perhaps. But I honestly really enjoyed my time with this game. It’s not a game to approach with an ounce of seriousness. Because, really, it’s a shallow experience. Casual and fun, but shallow nevertheless.

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Dungeon crawling Tomb Raider style: Yes, the archaeologist busts vases for loot.

As you can see from the above image, Temple of Osiris draws very heavily from games like Champions of Norrath and Diablo. The general premise is similar: Explore dungeons solo or with friends (This game even has couch co-op! Yay!) to slay mobs of enemies and collect loot. Again, let me be clear: this is not a game you will become too invested in. There’s little to no character creation or building. There isn’t even a skill tree! Lara Croft and company use guns and a staff that shoots a fancy Egyptian laser beam. That’s it.

Same can be said for loot and equipment. What you see is what you get. Of course, that didn’t stop me from getting excited when I won the RNG treasure chest lottery with a Legendary goody:

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Uploaded from my Twitter account, so the text is hard to read. Just trust me when I say it’s the best piece of loot I came across.

Gear doesn’t pop out of vases or enemies here. All you’ll get is gems, which become currency for opening treasure chests at the end of each dungeon and in the main map. Treasure chests have different tiers of loot ranging from 100 gems to 1,000 gems to open for your RNG jewelry. Rings and amulets are all you’ll find. Guns, of which there are a pleasantly surprising number, have to be earned through progression, challenge dungeons, or stage goals.

I enjoyed replaying stages to try meeting many of the optional challenges per dungeon. Almost every stage has a speed-run challenge, a “Collect 5 Red Skulls” challenge, and a few others with more variety based on level design. Meeting these requirements earns you gear, ammo upgrades, health upgrades, and even guns.

You really have to try some of the optional challenges, if for no other reason that they’re the only feature adding any sort of longevity to the experience. Well that, and replaying with friends for something to do for a couple of evenings.

I don’t know how much this title sells for on Playstation Network, and I don’t like to suggest good price points because we all look for different things in games. But I will say that as a free Playstation Plus game this month, it is one of my favorite free offerings to date. While not a typical Tomb Raider game, or as involved as many dungeon crawling games out there, it’s got great puzzles scattered throughout a relatively laid back, fun game.

Plus you get Egyptian gods shooting guns. That doesn’t happen very often now, does it?

Silent Hill: Revelation

Posted two years ago today!

Hardly Hobbies

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Why is Pyramid Head even here?!

Oh, where to start? Silent Hill: Revelation has been on Netflix so I’ve been meaning to watch it in the comfort of my own living room for a while now. It is only an hour and a half of time spent wishing this wasn’t a sub par video game-to-film adaptation, even of its own niche. While I won’t put it on par with the last couple of Resident Evil movies they’ve churned out, it is still pretty abysmal.

I’m gonna go out on a limb here and assume the following people are the only ones who went out of their way to see this film: fans of the video game, fans of horror movies, and unfortunate tag alongs. I’m a fan of the video game, of course. Actually, Silent Hill 3 (the video game entry this is loosely based on) was the first Silent…

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Styx: Master of Shadows

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This may be the first time I’ve played as a goblin instead of killing them.

Styx: Master of Shadows was free to download on Playstation Network last month. Since then, I’ve sat down and played it for a handful of hours. I had no prior knowledge or experience with Of Orcs and Men, so I didn’t exactly know what I was getting myself into. Styx is a game for hardcore stealth fans. Not wannabes like me who play the Assassin’s Creed series and think that suffices.

I started off liking the game well enough. I didn’t hate it, but I didn’t absolutely love it either. I made respectable progress, getting through the first couple of areas while the game slowly unravels the multitude of tricks and skills Styx has up his sleeves. I appreciate, and find a bit funny, a few of his human-killing methods. For example: Styx can puke in a bowl of fruit to poison and kill people. The animation is complete with green goop and sound effects to boot. Can’t say I’ve seen that before. The vomiting also lends credence to the game’s darker tones. Styx is vulgar, often proudly swearing between bouts of puking. As someone who never tires of gratuitous vulgarity, I was quite pleased.

As with many other video games, you can unlock skills to empower your character. Styx has otherwordly powers such as becoming invisible, vomiting up clones, and using Amber *cough* Eagle *cough* Vision to detect enemies and find hidden markers. These abilities are made possible through the use of Amber, the stimulant drug du jour in this world. Leveling up these amber abilities can only be done while at the hideout. This feature was the first turn off for me. I was only able to get to the hideout once the entire time I played. I’m the kind of person who can’t wait to burn points and get more powerful as soon as I can. Waiting until the game allowed me to in a game where you’re slowly trudging from point A to B because you can’t get seen just killed it for me.

Another turn off was the piss-poor battle system. I mean, I thought Assassin’s Creed was lazy with it, but now my eyes have been opened. At least in the AC series I can attack someone if I so choose. Styx is not so fortunate. If you make the mistake of catching a guard’s attention, prepare yourself: he, along with a dozen of  his friends who materialize out of nowhere, will gang up on you simultaneously. There’s no Gentleman’s Syndrome here, folks. They have no qualms with killing you while you’re stuck in a parry or kill animation. That’s all you can do, by the way: parry and kill. Every single fight is nothing more than determining your parry timing, and parrying however many times you have to until parry turns into kill. Then Styx knocks them to the ground, and while stabbing them to death, gets sliced up by their pissed off friend.

Yes, I understand this is a stealth game and combat should be avoided when necessary, but this is just ridiculous. Styx has all these neat tools to his disposal, so why can’t I use them during battle? I’d like the option to turn invisible and try sneaking off again (and seeing the guards crap themselves when I disappear into thin air). Or barfing up a clone to take some beatings while I pick one off. Or even puking up my poisonous vomit in their face while dueling. That’s the kind of dirty fighting Styx seems like he was made for. However, none of these creative devices that could make battles more interesting are even hinted at. Guess I’m just creative like that.

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I never got far enough to unlock the Kill From Above-type skill.

None of these complaints are even what put the fork in the game for me. I was still content with continuing along, (rather slowly I might add, with all the hard saving and reloading I finally resorted to thanks to the not generous auto saves and guard ganking), until a peculiar thing happened. I was in the midst of a “Don’t get seen or you have to start over from the last checkpoint” section. Something I’ve become akin to thanks to Assassin’s Creed. So I figured, “Okay, time to be diligent about not triggering guards.” No biggie. But then I got a peculiar message. Something about a dead body being seen. Okay. Before I have time to react, the game reloads.

Really? A game over for a dead body being detected? Without giving the player time to backtrack and try doing something about said body? Maybe I wasn’t paying enough attention, but I had no idea that a dead guard I left behind who knows how long ago would become a death sentence. Obviously if I had known it’d be such a BFD I would’ve tried harder to stealth past him or do away with the body. There’s only so many closets and chests to hide them in. Sure, an NPC gives you vials of acid to destroy corpses with, but you only get a couple to carry you over until God knows when.

And that’s it. I was in the middle of trying to solve a puzzle involving using the clone to pass through metal gates and activate triggers when I kept “dying” due to carelessly leaving a dead guard behind. I tried reloading a previous save, but it didn’t erase my mistake.

Then Lara Croft and the Temple of Osiris became available for free, thus putting Styx on the digital shelf to probably not be picked back up again.

If you’re hardcore into stealth games, or played Of Orcs and Men and enjoyed it, then I say go for this game. But for the rest of us, I wouldn’t really recommend it. Aside from Styx’s great voice acting and character, everything else was lackluster.

Telltale’s Game of Thrones, Episode 5: A Nest of Vipers

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Yep, he’s finally setting sail…

While a short episode, Episode 5 of Telltale Games’ Game of Thrones spin-off finally begins to move things forward to the grand finale and managed to get me pumped for the series again. Character arcs finally progress onward and the player finally gets to make a decision that seems like it’ll actually make a big splash in the narrative!

And, yeah, some characters die. The video game, like the HBO series and novels, always instigates a haunting “Who is going to die next?” voice repeating in my brain. Some deaths elicit glee and excitement, others sadness and dread. I felt a little bit of both this episode.

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Being in Cersei’s shadow is never a good thing.

Mira’s portions of this game tend to annoy me. I know they’re necessary to reflect the large part of GoT’s universe that is the political power struggle realized through touchy conversations, eye shifting, and layering lies until you can’t remember what the truth is anymore; but truth be damned, because anything is better than getting on Cersei’s bad side! Through her usual style of manipulating and plotting, Cersei now has Mira in the palm of her hand, which I can only take to mean things will end very badly for Mira soon. She annoys me, so I hope she gets a good dose of Cersei revenge.

Mr. Tuttle isn’t having too much fun wandering the frozen expanses of the northern wilderness in pursuit of the mythical North Grove. Without spoiling too much here, I’ll only say there is a battle scene thrown in to spruce things up and he trudge on. Continue on and possibly die from hypothermia or get killed by winter zombies, versus turning back and probably get his head lopped off for desertion. The world is his oyster.

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Pretty boy’s gonna get his arse beat.

As usual, I had the most fun while playing with Asher and Beskha. That pair always find themselves  in hot water and solving differences at sword point. In Episode 5, Asher must prove his worth to the meandering pit fighters, now ex-slaves with no purpose but wanton violence. After reigning supreme in the pit, Asher gets himself an army to take back to Westeros. Yes, Asher FINALLY sails back home.

And it doesn’t take long for Asher to find more trouble. At least this time he is uniting with his Forrester family against the Whitehills. Unfortunately, Asher’s reunion with his family is short-lived before grief strikes yet again and the player is left to a difficult, and I’m hoping profound, choice.

I’m just going to leave it at that. You’re welcome.

Entwined

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So Pretty…

Entwinted was a free Playstation Plus download on the Playstation 3 for the month of July. I recalled the indie game being showcased at E3 last year. The style and colors were mesmerizing, and I told myself I would check the game out one day. About a year later I finally followed through. It was free, after all.

The concept behind Entwined is relatively simple. The player assists two star-crossed lovers; an orange fish and a blue bird, who somehow met and fell and love. Now, as you can imagine, they’re tragically separated for all of eternity and it is up to the player to assist them with uniting into a fancy green dragon every lifetime and liberating the creatures by drawing in the sky.

Don’t think too hard about that.

This translates into a simple, yet immersive, gaming experience to start. Entwinted is easy to pick up and play. The left half of the screen represents the fish’s realm, and the player is assigned the left analog stick to move the fish around it’s domain. Similarly, the right hand side and right analog stick are reserved for moving the bird. The player must navigate both avatars simultaneously to hit or move through their corresponding colors to fill their bars. At times there are green zones the fish and bird must enter together. Missing will cause the corresponding bar to deplete.

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There are orbs to collect as well.

Once the fish and bird both have filled bars, they flash and you’re prompted to press L1 and R1 simultaneously to begin what I call the Unity Phase. Their bars link across the top of the screen, and each successful move will cause the bars to creep together until they are conjoined to create a green dragon. Then they’re free to spend the rest of that lifetime bonded in their love for each other, painting beautiful streams in the sky until the cycle is set to repeat and you get to do it all over again.

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Collect things as dragon. Because reasons.

Entwined clearly takes heavy inspiration from artsy-fartsy games like Journey and Flower created by thatgamecompany. And, to its credit, it does start off as enchanting as those titles, providing sufficient escapism. However, I felt like a lot of the charm with Journey, for example, was that I became so immersed I really forgot I was playing a video game. While playing Entwined, especially in the later Lifetimes, the difficulty is amped so I felt like I was constantly being pulled from the experience.

I know, I know: Get Good. My only problem was I couldn’t figure out what the hell I was doing wrong half the time. I can’t get better if I can’t identify what I’m doing incorrectly in the first place. Despite my glaring lack of self-reflection, I was able to beat the game in a little over an hour.

Overall, I did enjoy my time with Entwinted. The gorgeous aesthetics, impressive soundtrack, and easy to pick up controls entertained me for about an hour. Whether it is worth the full price tag ($10, I believe) isn’t for me to say. But free is the best price of all, and this is certainly an indie title worth checking out.